Science-fiction

1973 is a special year in the history of science fiction. It’s still the golden age of speculative fiction (Philip K. Dick, Philip José Farmer), but something new appears: science-fiction becomes real. J. G. Ballard publishes Crash and declares “The fiction is already there. The writer’s task is to invent the reality.”1

This same year, Sakyo Komatsu, a Japonese TV journalist and Italian literature scholar, publishes Nippon Chinbotsu (La submersion du Japon), a novel that brings to life a Japan with the same greatness, sensitivity, shyness and corruption that today’s. Japan sinks is a great novel, one of those that invents reality to best embrace it. Read it.

PS. Publishers being what they are, not one realized that the book could become a best-seller again, and it is out-of-print today in both French and English.

This post is also available in: French

  1. Preface to the French edition of Crash, translated by Wikiquotes. []

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